The newly developed biopolymer plastic is produced using ethanol from sugar cane as opposed to conventional polyethylene, maintaining 97% of the chemical properties of conventional HDPE. This constitution ensures that the packaging retains its performance and appearance characteristics while offering 100% recyclability and sustainability. The Bio-HDPE packaging has 96% bio-based content, which is manufactured from sugar cane.

Commenting upon ITC moving to fully recyclable material, Jo Buck from Rose Plastic UK Ltd says: “Bio-HDPE packaging has environmental benefits throughout the supply chain. This includes a 14% reduction in materials used in the BlockPack range, huge absorption of CO2 throughout the production process and the recycling of sugar cane bagasse residue to replace conventional energy sources.

“This is our most environmentally friendly packaging yet, and we’re delighted to now have a completely new range of sustainable Bio-HDPE packaging solutions available for 2020,” adds Buck. “We have a long-standing relationship with ITC and, with both parties being conscious of their environmental responsibilities, this packaging is a huge move forward. ITC is the first adopter of Bio-HDPE packaging.”

ITC’s marketing manager Georgia Graves adds: “We are committed to our social and environmental responsibilities, and having a long-term supplier like Rose Plastic develop this packaging is another step forward in our journey to becoming carbon neutral.

“Although Bio-HDPE packaging reduces our carbon footprint and improves our environmental credentials, a critically important aspect is quality of packaging,” she continues. “We have to be conscious of the ability of any packaging to protect the contents and eliminate the potential for in-transit damage, while retaining quality and aesthetics. The Bio-HDPE packaging we have adopted from Rose Plastic meets all of our rigorous needs.”